Clean Water

“Every year, over 800,000 people, including more than 340,000 children under five, die from diseases caused by unsafe water, inadequate sanitation, or poor hygiene.”

Each year, hundreds of thousands of adults and children die from diseases introduced via unsafe water, inadequate sanitation, or poor hygiene. Billions around the world lack access to safe water at home and more than half of the world’s population lacks safely managed sanitation. As a result, water-borne diseases like diarrhea, cholera and dysentery, all potentially fatal conditions, are pervasive. In fact, hundreds of thousands of children die each year from water-borne diseases alone.

Women in particular bear the brunt of the lack of availability to clean and safe water. Charged with transporting water, women and girls often walk miles per day to fetch water. And, each time a woman sets out for a distant water source, she runs the risk of encountering violence along the way. Reliable access to clean, close water reduces that risk, encourages women with the time and security to invest in family and community development and gives girls the opportunity to attend school.

Education

Illiteracy in Uganda is generally considered to be the inability to read and write, but this goes further than just that. The in depth definition of illiteracy is the inadequacy of reading and writing skills to manage the daily life tasks. Yes, the government of Uganda tried its best and started up the Universal Primary Education and the Universal Secondary Education that furnished opportunities for every child in Uganda to access education. But this was only kept in the very poor government schools that even a primary seven pupil cannot be compared to a primary three pupil in a good private school.

Each year, hundreds of thousands of adults and children die from diseases introduced via unsafe water, inadequate sanitation, or poor hygiene. Billions around the world lack access to safe water at home and more than half of the world’s population lacks safely managed sanitation. As a result, water-borne diseases like diarrhea, cholera and dysentery, all potentially fatal conditions, are pervasive. In fact, hundreds of thousands of children die each year from water-borne diseases alone.

Hunger

Approximately 29 percent of children under the age of five are stunted, meaning they are too short for their ages. Stunting is a result of undernourishment and malnutrition and can lead to a number of other physical and mental health problems. More than half of the adult population in Uganda was stunted during childhood.

Undernourished children are more likely to drop out of school or repeat academic years. An estimated 133,000 Ugandan children per year have to repeat grades. Uganda’s government released a report in 2013 that said, “When the child is undernourished, that child’s brain is less likely to develop at healthy rates, and that child is more likely to have cognitive delays.” Children in poverty have even less of a chance of getting out of poverty if they cannot get an education

Child Abuse

Everything we do protects children today and prevents abuse tomorrow, to transform society for every childhood, that’s why we’re here and that’s what drives all of our work. But it’s only possible with your support. Violence, exploitation and abuse in all forms puts children’s physical and mental health and education at risk, jeopardizing their development and entire future. ACDI Uganda works to build a strong system to prevent and respond to violence against children and women in all contexts. Most children in Uganda have experienced physical violence that threatens and halts their holistic and positive development – 59 per cent of girls and 68 per cent of boys. Gender-based violence and sexual violence are also pervasive, with some 35 per cent of girls and 17 per cent of boys having experienced sexual violence during childhood.

Girls are especially at risk of child marriage, teenage pregnancy, and female genital mutilation. Today, 4 in 10 women aged 20 to 49 years are married by 18 years, and at least 1 in 4 teenage girls are either pregnant or have a child. Child labour is pervasive, with children mainly working in the informal sector. In rural areas, 93 per cent of children are engaged in agriculture and fishing. In Uganda, most children have experienced some form of violence and abuse. More than 8 million children are considered to be vulnerable to harm.

Sexual abuse is the most common form of violence, with gender as a major risk factor. Every day, around 26 girls are defiled. Rape is on the increase, rising by 30 per cent from 7,360 reported cases in 2009 to 9,588 in 2013. Girls are also threatened by child marriage and female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C). Uganda is among the top 25 countries with the highest rates of child marriage. In eastern and north-eastern Uganda, in particular Karamoja and Sebei regions, girls as young as 10 have to endure FGM/C as a rite of passage to womanhood.

Creative Society

The Creative Society project is a cause of all people. This is why participants themselves implement this initiative. Participants of the Creative Society project represent general public. These people advocate implementing the eight Foundations of the Creative Society in all countries of the world for the benefit of all people. Read more about the stages of building the Creative Society in the article A precedent for the creation of this project was the global international conference “Society. The Last Chance” that has united people from many countries of the world. play-icon

Residing in different parts of the world, people have gathered in numerous conference halls and simultaneously got connected with each other in a video broadcast via the Internet in order to frankly and honestly discuss the challenges faced by the modern civilisation. The conference has led to the conclusion that the main problem of contemporary humanity is the consumerist format of society. While the only way out of the current dead-end situation is a change of the society format entirely from a consumerist to a creative one.

Website: https://creativesociety.com

Religion

Here at Alliance Child Development Initiative Uganda, we raise children with the basic religious principles and practices. Religion is very important for many societies; it allows children to learn morals, and answers questions regarding life and death, relationships between people and their place in the world, and notions of good and evil. The major religions are all based on ideals of wisdom, solidarity and justice. All this is transmitted to children by their family, school and society so that they may become wise and respectful